One fine day Helium and Hydrogen met at a get-together, 'Why did you marry Carbon?'

The quick reply was "We bonded from the minute we met."


184 result(s) found for the term(s) 'Everyday Chemistry'

Everyday Chemistry - Why ice cubes are cloudy on the inside

Have you even tried to see through an ice cube? It's always a little hazy. Isn't it strange that transparent water when frozen becomes cloudy ice? And did you know chemistry is at play even here?

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Everyday Chemistry - Why do fish smell when you buy them?

Heard of the saying "something smells fishy"? Have you noticed how a fresh fish smells different from one that is not so fresh? Yes, once again it is chemistry that is the reason behind this.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why does baking soda extinguish fires?

Playing with fire is always a dangerous thing. In the case of an accident, you can extinguish a fire in a number of ways. One of them is by using baking soda.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why does a kitchen gas burner glow yellow when liquid comes in contact with it?

If you have been in the kitchen when your mother boils some water or milk, you may notice the flame of the gas burner turns yellow when liquid comes in contact with the flame. Did you know that there is chemistry at work behind this?

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Everyday Chemistry - How to harness the power of the waves

The earth is running out of fossil fuel. Soon there will be none left. So, the search for a clean and efficient alternative is on in full-swing. Harnessing the power of the waves is one way to create energy. Have you felt the power of the waves when taking a bath in the sea? The energy produced by surface ocean waves is tremendous. It's used to create electricity, to pump water into reservoir, and in desalination.

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Everyday Chemistry - Ever wondered why people use Iodine in CAT scans?

Have you ever been to a hospital with a person who needed to have a CAT scan done and wondered what that was all about? A CAT scan is a special kind of X-ray. It provides a three dimensional image of what is inside an object by using several two dimensional X-ray images. You may have seen a nurse giving patients an injection before the CAT scan begins. This is usually a solution of iodine.

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Everyday Chemistry - The science behind soda water

We all love to have a sip of our favourite soft drink when we are thirsty, especially in summers. And we also love to have a little fizz in it. This fizz is the bubbly effervescence that is produced by adding pressurized carbon dioxide gas to water. It's also called carbonated water or just soda water.

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Everyday Chemistry - The origins of soap

Everyone needs to stay clean, whether we like it or not. After a rough day on the playing field, a bath with soap gives us that fresh feeling. Soap is wonderful, the way it bubbles and the sweet smell that it has. Apart from bathing, we wash our clothes and clean our utensils with soap. We use soap everyday but do we know the story of soap? It is an excellent example of everyday chemistry in action.

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Everyday Chemistry - The secret about smog

On a cold winter morning, if you take a walk outside in our nation's capital, you are likely to be surrounded by a thick cloud of smoke. And you may not be able to see anything at all. This is because of smog. Here is a little clarity about why things get smoky during the winters.

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Everyday Chemistry - It's raining raincoats

When it rains, it pours. The only way to stay dry when there are strong winds is a raincoat. You may use one when you go to school or you may have seen your dad wear one when he goes for work in the rainy season. Haven't you ever wondered how these raincoats are different from the normal clothes you wear?

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Everyday Chemistry - Why do we detect an odour when LPG leaks

Your mother might have warned you many times to tell her if you ever get a pungent smell from the kitchen. The smell might have been from a gas leak. Read on to know what it actually is. And what you should do when you detect a leak.

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Everyday Chemistry - Global warming and greenhouse gases

The earth is surrounded by an envelope of gases called atmosphere. These layers of gases include gases called Greenhouse gases. It is these gases that make living on our planet possible.

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Everyday Chemistry - Getting to know glass

It's very clear that glass is an important part of our everyday lives. From the glass we drink water in, to the spectacles we wear, to window panes; glass is just everywhere.

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Everyday Chemistry - Geothermal energy: Harnessing the power of the planet

Wouldn't it be interesting if the earth were a rechargeable battery that we could use for all our energy needs. With geothermal energy this may just be possible.

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Everyday Chemistry - Understanding genetic engineering

You must of heard of the term genetic engineering in the news or in the papers. But what does it mean? Is it good for us? What are its benefits? If you have ever had any of these queries, then you are in the right place!

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Everyday Chemistry - Fiery facts about firecrackers

We love to make noise as kids. We also like things that make noise. This is why firecrackers are so much fun. Especially the ones that make the maximum noise.

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Everyday Chemistry - All you ever wanted to know about cloud seeding

Have you ever wondered if you could make rain when you're feeling hot? Or just whenever you want? Learn how this can be possible with cloud seeding.

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Everyday Chemistry - Chocolate: Food for the Gods & food for thought

'Chocolate' is one word that is mouth watering. Who could resist the delicious aroma of melted chocolate or a crunchy chocolate bar? Did you know that chocolate has 500 flavour components and a number of types, to suit every palate? In fact, chocolate's melting point is just below your body temperature, so it melts in your mouth! The melting increases our brain activity and heart rates, making us get excited and wanting even more!

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Everyday Chemistry - Fun facts about chewing gum to chew on

Chewing gum is one of the oldest sweets known to man beginning as a chewy tree sap from the Mastiche trees of ancient Greece. Across the world even the Mayans of South America liked chewy treats. It was in the 1800s that entrepreneur John Curtis introduced chewing gum to the US with his small sticks of "Maine Pure Spruce Gum."

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Everyday Chemistry - Understanding ceramics

You must have noticed a set of smooth plates, cups and bowls at home that your mother keeps safely. She must have even told you to be careful while using it. Chances are there that these pieces of crockery are made of ceramic.

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Everyday Chemistry - Cement: the backbone of building tomorrow

Cement is the one of the most common substances used by man. Whether it's a small village, town or bustling city, cement is the one substance that helps in making strong buildings.

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Everyday Chemistry - What gives the blue in blue jeans?

Jeans are stylish. Jeans are cool. And jeans are mostly blue.

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Everyday Chemistry - The basics about balloons

Balloons are fun. Well, aren't they? Be it the small ones you see at birthday parties or the giant ones you see floating in the sky, balloons are wonderful. If you are fascinated by balloons, the chemistry behind it will just blow you away.

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Everyday Chemistry - The stinging truth about acid rain

When you hear the words acid rain, you think of something that is dangerous and is likely to burn you skin. Think about it, what could be worse than having acid which seems to burn everything it touches when falling from the sky. Why even umbrellas aren't going to help us then!

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Everyday Chemistry - The sticky truth about adhesive tape

Adhesive tape is a tape that is coated with adhesive either on one side or both, and used for temporarily or permanently joining two overlapping materials. Adhesive tape is something we all use in our daily lives. It serves a number of purposes. Its convenience makes it virtually indispensable in our homes and while at work. If for example, you accidentally tear an important document at work, you reach for an adhesive tape to fix it in a jiffy. Though this invention has become indispensable in our lives, have you ever thought about what is the science behind this invention?

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Everyday Chemistry - The history behind your eraser

An eraser is an instrument of stationery used to remove pencil and sometimes pen marks. It is rather interesting to know that before the invention of erasers slabs of wax and breadcrumbs were used to 'wipe out' charcoal or lead marks from paper. Can you imagine doing that in the classroom? The first pencils were discovered around 1560's but people did not have anything that could rub out the marks with.

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Everyday Chemistry - Interesting facts about ink

Ink is a pigment or dye that is used for colouring a surface in order to produce an image or a text. You use ink in many ways, whether it is the ink in your ballpoint pen, your father's special fountain pen or the ink used in your printer cartridge.

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Everyday Chemistry - The history and science of Post-it notes

Have you ever seen that little Post-it note that your dad uses? That square yellow paper that he uses to makes notes on and pastes it to books and newspapers, or even on the refrigerator. Isn't it interesting how you can stick it somewhere then remove it easily and stick it somewhere else entirely?

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Everyday Chemistry - The polished facts about nail polish

Women love their makeup, and out of the hundreds of makeup products, nail polish is on the top five of their list. Nail polish today has become a significant part of women's fashion and nail care. These small bottles of coloured nitrocellulose have become a symbol of the 20th century, with more than half the women using it.

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Everyday Chemistry - The chemistry behind your mother's lipstick

I am sure you have seen your mother or sister using it, or if you are a girl, you probably have one tucked somewhere for special occasions. Lipstick is that waxy crayon-like cosmetic in a tube-like container used to colour lips.

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Everyday Chemistry - Interesting facts about insect repellent

Insect repellent is a substance applied to skin, clothing and certain surfaces to prevent the attack of insects.

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Everyday Chemistry - I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream!

Chocolate, strawberry, mint, chocolate chip, butterscotch, vanilla - the list is endless. You may have just one favourite flavour, but whether we're five years old or fifty, we all love ice cream don't we? But there's a lot more to ice cream than most of us generally know.

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Everyday Chemistry - The basics about biogas

Biogas is formed when organic matter breaks down due to no oxygen. This gas is made of methane and carbon dioxide and is used as a fuel. As a form of fuel, biogas is especially important for the villages of India, who use it for their cooking.

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Everyday Chemistry - Tree logging and its environmental impact

Have you seen cartoons and movies in which people, while cutting trees, shout 'Timber" as loudly as they can? This is to alert co-workers and people in the area as a safety precaution that a tree is going to fall.The process of cutting down trees in large numbers for the purpose of timber or forest management is called logging.

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Everyday Chemistry - Fast facts about food colours

Isn't it interesting to eat colourful food? Did you know that often food colouring is added to make what you eat so colourful? Any digestible substance added to food or drink in order to change its colour is known as food colour. Food colours are used both commercially as well as in domestic cooking.

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Everyday Chemistry - What goes into making a pencil

I am sure you would have used a pencil in the recent past. Whether it was just to doodle something or to take down notes, the pencil is an excellent tool to make a marking that is not permanent. Pencils are usually made of graphite or in some cases coloured pigment or charcoal, encased in a wooden cylinder. It can be used for writing, marking and drawing.

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Everyday Chemistry - Sparkling facts about tooth whiteners

Everybody loves to have white teeth. One of the most common procedures that dentists do these days is cosmetic dentistry. In this, tooth whitening is the most common and successful procedure. Over the last few years, tooth whitening has become very popular as it's an easy, inexpensive way to show off.

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Everyday Chemistry - The chemistry of correction fluid

Correction fluid is an opaque, white fluid that is used to paint over writing or painting errors. Before the invention of word processors, correction fluid was the easiest way you could correct a mistake in a handwritten document.

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Everyday Chemistry - The story of paper

Story books, newspapers, magazines and notebooks are all made of paper. Though we use paper every day, we take it for granted since it's easily available. Yet inventing paper itself was a challenge for man.

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Everyday Chemistry - Coral Bleaching

Corals are one of nature's wonders. You may have seen videos of divers swimming near colourful coral reefs documentaries or movies. These beautiful sea organisms are now losing the algae that give them their colour. This loss of colour is caused by stress factors like pollution, water temperature and sedimentation and is known as coral bleaching.

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Everyday Chemistry - Let's understand lactose intolerance

Everyone enjoys a healthy glass of milk to go with doughnuts, cakes, pancakes, cheese, cookies and such food. Yet not everyone can have milk or any of these foods. Why? Because there are some people who have something called lactose intolerance. Their bodies can't digest lactose, the sugar found in almost every dairy product.

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Everyday Chemistry - Is jelly a solid or a liquid?

We enjoy having jelly for dessert. It is not only a colourful dessert, the way jelly wobbles makes us enjoy playing with it while we eat. Why jelly wobbles all boils down to chemistry.

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Everyday Chemistry - Is too much water bad for you?

The first thing you reach for when you are thirsty is a glass of water. Nothing quenches your thirst like a glass of water. However, too much of anything is not good. Drinking too much water can give you water intoxication.

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Everyday Chemistry - Protein, the building blocks of our body

Protein plays an important role in your diet. Our body needs protein as it is a major part of the skin, muscles, organs and glands. This is why your mother plans your diet to ensure you have a lot of protein in it.

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Everyday Chemistry - Shedding a little light on photovoltaic cells

Do you remember seeing your dad's calculator that had that strange strip which powered it? Remember how you were playing with it when you asked him to help you solve your maths problem? Wasn't it fun to keep your finger over the strip and after a time to see the calculator shut down? That was a photovoltaic cell, the thing that makes solar energy possible.

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Everyday Chemistry - The sticky facts about superglue

One of the strongest glues available at your local hardware store is Superglue. Just one-square inch of this glue can hold up to a ton! What's more this glue is fast. It can fix anything within seconds of applying it.

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Everyday Chemistry - The chemistry that brews in your cup of coffee

Today there are cafe's everywhere and new ones keep cropping up. Everyone enjoys a coffee break to catch up over a cup of coffee. Though we enjoy drinking a cup of coffee, few of us know that it is the chemistry behind your cup of coffee that makes it enjoyable?

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Everyday Chemistry - Why does cabbage change colour when cooked?

If you have ever watched your mother cooking red cabbage you might have noticed it changes colour once it's cooked. Strange isn't it? Not if you think that cooking is chemistry after all and this is another excellent example of chemistry in our everyday life.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why doesn't oil dissolve in water?

Water is the 'universal solvent', almost all substances dissolve in it. Oil is the one substance that does not dissolve in water. However hard you try you will always see that if you try to mix the two, you will notice that the oil layer lies about the water.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why does hair turn grey?

Having grey hair is part of growing old. Even in your own family you are likely to have uncles and aunts who have grey or white hair. The changing of hair colour is just another example of chemistry at work in your own body.

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Everyday Chemistry - The chemistry behind batteries!

Can you imagine what a day without batteries would be like? Almost everything around us is powered by batteries. From your television remote to your mobile phone and even the family car has a battery in it. Without the battery, our life would be a tangled mess. We would have to use long extension wires for anything that needed to move a distance.

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Everyday Chemistry - Few facts about fuel cells

Have you heard of the electric car? These cars are very similar to the normal cars. What makes these cars different is that they use large batteries to power them instead of using petrol. What make these environmentally friendly cars possible are fuel cells.

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Everyday Chemistry - The fundamentals of fermentation

Though you may never have heard of fermentation, you are likely to have experienced it. Fermentation helped make that piece of toast you had for breakfast. It is also responsible for making yoghurt, wine and beer.

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Everyday Chemistry - What makes stain removers, remove stains?

Even though our mother warns us time and again, we somehow manage to drop something like tea or dal on our favourite shirt. That shirt would be ruined if it were not our mother's stain remover. Did you know that there are more than ten different types of stain remover? These range from stain removal powders, tablets, liquids, to sprays.

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Everyday Chemistry - How the paints that colour our lives work

We all like a bit of colour in our life. Man has been using paints to give us this touch of colour ever since the days of cave paintings where red and yellow ochre colouring was used to draw pictures. Today paints and dyes are used for everything from home appliances to homes themselves.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why cold cream is so cool to touch

Cold cream gets its name from the cool feeling that you get when you apply it on your skin. It is used to cleanse the skin, remove makeup and soften the skin. They are also used on sunburnt skin. How this cream manages it is a cool bit of chemistry.

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Everyday Chemistry - How plastics are made

We all use products that are made out of plastics. From the toothbrush that we use in the morning to the plastic cutlery of take away food, plastic has become part and parcel of our life.

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Everyday Chemistry - Understanding hydrocarbons

Hydrocarbons are compounds that are made entirely out of hydrogen and carbon. We come across hydrocarbons in our day to day lives but don't realise it at times. When you go to the petrol bunk you fill your car with a mixture of hexane-septane-octane- nonane mixture. Doesn't sound familiar? Its gasoline!

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Everyday Chemistry - Astounding facts about alcohols

Think of alcohol and you may think of the drinks like beer, wine and whisky that your dad may lock away or reserves for those special parties where only 'adults' are allowed to drink. But for a chemist, these are just few of the alcohols that a chemist knows.

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Everyday Chemistry - The making of moth balls

Moth balls are small balls of chemical pesticide used to protect your clothes against moths. The vapour of the moth ball, that smells pleasant to humans, kills both moths and moth larvae. Mothballs are highly toxic and should be kept out of reach of children and pets.

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Everyday Chemistry - Fruity facts about carboxylic acid

Do you remember the amazing refreshing feeling of a glass of lemonade on a hot summer's day? You may have noticed the sharp sour taste of the lemonade. This tartness is a result of carboxylic acids. This is an organic acid that is found in a variety of fruits including grapes, lemons and vinegar.

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Everyday Chemistry - Discovering carbohydrates!

Carbohydrates are organic compounds of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. The proportion between the hydrogen and oxygen in this is the same as it is in water. Plants produce carbohydrates by the process of photosynthesis.

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Everyday Chemistry - A few facts about carbon fibre

Carbon fibre is a lightweight yet strong substance. Many things from sports equipment like golf clubs and tennis racquets to sports cars use carbon fibre. Carbon fibre is easily identifiable by its unique chequered appearance.

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Everyday Chemistry - Getting down to earth with facts about fertilisers

Just like the human body requires important nutrients to survive, plants also need essential nutrients. Apart from getting these nutrients naturally, we sometimes help plants by giving them fertilisers that encourage their growth.

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Everyday Chemistry - What makes an eggshell and why do they crack?

You may have heard your mother telling you that when you boil an egg you should keep it in cold water and then heat it slowly. Did you know that there is chemistry at work behind this advice?

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Everyday Chemistry - Household cleaners

We use chemicals to keep our house clean. Two popular chemicals used for this are ammonia and bleach. Though both are effective cleaners, you might notice a warning on their containers telling you not to mix each other.

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Everyday Chemistry - The colourful truth about dyes

We all like to wear colourful clothes. Whether a special occasion or just daily wear, it's always nice to add a little colour in our lives. Dyes are the chemical substances that are responsible for turning plain cloth into the colourful garments that we wear every day.

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Everyday Chemistry - Mighty Milk

Most of us enjoy a glass of milk. Whether we have it plain or flavoured, milk is the ultimate health drink that our parents have given us. This white wonder is full of healthy vitamins and other chemicals.

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Everyday Chemistry - Looking back at Plaster of Paris

We have all seen a plaster cast some time or the other. They help people who have had accidents and broken their bones to get better quickly. The same substance is used to make sculptures and decorate your home.

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Everyday Chemistry - The sparkling truth about diamonds

Diamonds are always called a girl's best friend. They are formed from carbon and are used for a variety of purposes from jewellery to use in lasers and cutting and polishing tools. Though most diamonds are colourless you do come across a few; rare coloured diamonds.

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Everyday Chemistry - How antacids work

There are times when your tummy is not all right, after you have been eating all that junk food and soft drinks. Your mummy might give you some pills to make you feel better. It is likely that this medicine is an antacid. Learn about how these medicines help you feel better and the chemistry behind them.

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Everyday Chemistry - Whipping egg whites into shape

You might notice that some of your mother's recipe books specifically ask you to beat egg white in glass bowls. Even these little things are connected to Chemistry.

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Everyday Chemistry - Creating artificial fog

Artificial smoke and fog provides a special effect for music artists performing on stage. Most artists make use of this effect to complement it with lighting while they are on tour. This extraordinary visual effect would not be possible were it not for chemistry.

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Everyday Chemistry - Lava Lamp

Lava lamps are interesting curios to have. Though they often don't look like much, we kids are captivated by how those little blob things are always in motion is quite fascinating.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why does wine get crystals over time?

The process that turns grape juice into red or white wine is basically a chemical process. Discover the chemistry behind this process.

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Everyday Chemistry - Colouring Easter Eggs

By Dr. Nagabhushana K S

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Everyday Chemistry - A flash of light

Taking photographs is always fun. But when the sun goes down and there is hardly any light, it is difficult to take a photo. Today this is no longer a problem with the invention of camera flash.

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Everyday Chemistry - Keeping things dry

We often find small sachets in the packaging of expensive electronic equipment like cameras or cell phones. These little packets contain substances called desiccants, which are used to ensure everything stays dry.

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Everyday Chemistry - Colourful seashells

She sells sea shells on the sea shore. You might have heard this tongue twister before. You may even have collected shells from the beach before. But have you ever wondered how these spectacular sea shells get their beautiful colours?

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Everyday Chemistry - The chemistry of rocketry

For a long time man has aspired to reach the stars. Rockets have taken man to the moon and back. Today one of the most spectacular sights to see is the billows of white clouds that accompany a shuttle lift off. It's time to learn about the basic chemistry behind rocketry.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why is hydrogen peroxide stored in dark bottles?

You may have noticed that the hydrogen peroxide in your school laboratory is always stored in a dark tinted bottle. Ever wondered why?

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Everyday Chemistry - Vinegar and its winning properties

If you have seen copper or bronze statutes or curios you may have noticed that they turn black or green in colour. Did you know that you can use vinegar to clean this?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Balancing Chemical Equations

Have a tough time balancing chemical equations? This video will show you how.

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Everyday Chemistry - A tale of vinegar and hard water

If you live in an area where the water is hard, you may notice that when you wash utensils, a thin white stain is left behind. Did you know you can use vinegar to remove these stains?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: The mole and Avogadro's number

The mole is defined as an amount of any substance that contains 6.023 X 10^23 atoms or molecules of that substance.

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Everyday Chemistry - Stepping into the limelight

When you are the focus of everyone's attention, you have stepped into the limelight. Ever wondered how the expression arose?

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Everyday Chemistry - How does an anaesthetic put you to sleep?

Someone in your family may have had an operation. Have you wondered why they are made to sleep before being taken to the operation theatre?

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Everyday Chemistry - How is puff pastry made?

Whenever you eat a khari biscuit or a veg. puff, have you ever wondered how the baker made those thin, crispy layers? There's a lot of chemistry behind it.

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Everyday Chemistry - How are glass bulbs frosted?

When studying for exams, you may have been bothered by the harsh glare from a light bulb or tube light. Use a frosted bulb, which reduces glare by giving diffused light.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why is chlorine added to swimming pools?

Ever taken a dip in a swimming pool, and wondered why the water tastes funny? That's because of the chlorine added to the water, as a disinfectant.

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Everyday Chemistry - Chilly hot, water cold, chilly hot again?

When you've eaten something spicy, you take a quick gulp of water to damp the hotness. But after sometime, it feels hot again. Why?

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Everyday Chemistry - Now you see it, now you don't!

If your father is a diplomat you might have noticed him scribbling on a note with a pen that didn't seem to have any ink in it. Though invisible ink is something you read in stories it really does exist. Here's how it works.

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Everyday Chemistry - Growing Greener Food

While chemistry has been a great benefit to us, sometimes its applications have caused harm. The widespread use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers is an example. One step towards the solution is growing more organic food.

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Everyday Chemistry - How can I earn carbon credits?

Every activity we do leads to the emission of some carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Do you know that you can now measure how much carbon dioxide you are using, and thus know how to reduce it? This is done by trading 'carbon credits'.

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Everyday Chemistry - Making Eco-friendly Plastics

When you next go shopping, you'll probably come back with a plastic bag or two. Try an experiment with it. Take a flower pot, and bury a paper bag and a plastic bag in it. Wait for a month, and dig them out. Which one had degraded?

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Everyday Chemistry - E-waste: Reduce, Recycle, Reuse

Nowadays, we've hardly bought a new mobile phone or computer that new models appear. Have you ever wondered what happens to those old phones and laptops we stopped using?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: What happens when crude oil spills into the sea?

If you watch news on TV, you may have seen images of petroleum spilling into the sea in the Gulf of Mexico. It causes a lot of environmental destruction, as it affects the fishes and other creatures of the sea, as well as birds like pelicans and sea gulls that live by the sea. But why does an oil spill cause so much destruction?

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Everyday Chemistry - Disposing radioactive wastes safely

Radioactive materials play an important role in our lives. Some of the electricity you use comes from a nuclear power plant which uses them. Radio-isotopes are used in many medical applications. But did you know that once used, radioactive substances must be disposed off carefully?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Carbon Dioxide (part I)

We know today that carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere by our activities is causing climate change. But how much do we understand of this intriguing molecule, and how important it is to us?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Carbon Dioxide (part II)

In the last video, we saw how carbon dioxide was useful to us in many ways. So why is it such a danger to the planet?

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Everyday Chemistry - The green way to bright light

We often see posters or TV ads advising us to shift from ordinary tube lights and bulbs to CFL lamps. Let's explore why it makes sense, and why it is good for the environment to do so.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: How Plants matter to Chemistry

The plant kingdom is very important to us, for it provides us with food, clothing, wood and many other products. Most importantly, plants convert carbon dioxide to life. What secrets do they hold for our future?

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Everyday Chemistry - Catalysing a greener planet

If you or your friend bought a car recently, you may know that it has to adhere to BS-IV emission standards. Ever wondered what these are, and why we must stick by them?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Understanding pH

If you have had difficulty in school trying to understand the concept of pH, here's a video that can help.

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Everyday Chemistry - An Electrifying Tale of Furniture Polish

Try this little experiment. Take an old, unpolished piece of wood and rub it vigorously with a woolen (or cotton) cloth. Then bring the piece near your hand. Did you get a small electric shock?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: The Fuss about Uranium

You'll have seen or read in the news about how some countries are trying to develop nuclear weapons, and how some countries are trying to stop them. The element uranium lies below all of this fuss, so let's try to understand its chemistry.

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Everyday Chemistry - What is chromatography?

Some medicines we buy are mixtures of two or more drugs in a particular proportion. But how do manufacturers ensure that those proportions are correct? They use an analytical technique called chromatography.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: The chemistry of the World Cup

In the final of the FIFA World Cup 2010 in South Africa, you must have watched Spain hold aloft the golden Cup itself. So we thought it would be apt to share a video explaining the chemistry behind the making of the cup!

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Everyday Chemistry - The chemistry of perming & rebonding

Some of us have naturally curly hair but want it straightened; others have it naturally straight but want it curly. But whatever the style you like to wear, there's chemistry involved in it!

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Everyday Chemistry - How do oysters make pearls?

Pearls have fascinated people since ancient times. Their colour, iridescence, shape and smoothness make them fascinating. But do you know that more than 99% of pearls today are not made naturally?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: the 'Traffic Lights' Reaction

Have you watched a solution that changes colour from green to red? Here's a video that shows how chemistry can be quite fun.

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Everyday Chemistry - How does reverse osmosis purify water?

If you go to an appliances shop, you'll notice many brands of water purifiers that work by reverse osmosis. You may have one at home too. But how exactly does reverse osmosis work?

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Everyday Chemistry - Why does a car windshield repel water?

Next time you drink a glass of water, try cleaning it with a piece of rubber. There will still be a thin film of water left on the glass. Now look at how a car's windshield wiper works. How does that clean off the water, though it is made of rubber too?

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Everyday Chemistry - How do bullet-proof jackets stop bullets?

If you like action films, you might watch the hero battle all the villains, and remain unhurt even though the villains are firing hundreds of bullets at him. He's wearing a bullet-proof jacket, but how does that work?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Understanding Chemical Bonds

If you have had difficulty trying to know the difference between covalent, ionic and metallic bonds, here's a video that can help.

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Everyday Chemistry - Potassium permanganate: the all rounder salt

If you've seen a well being cleaned, you may have noticed that a reddish brown powder is thrown into it. That would be potassium permanganate, which is one of chemistry's most useful substances.

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Everyday Chemistry - Cholesterol: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

You may have seen some TV ads talking about managing cholesterol with one or the other brand of cooking oil. Let's try and understand how cholesterol is important to us.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Demystifying mercury

We have all had to use a thermometer some time or the other. If you ever wondered what that silvery fluid that helps tell temperature about, this is the perfect video for you.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why are cakes baked in borosilicate glass dishes?

When you're baking a cake at home, your mom will tell you to put the cake mix in a special borosilicate glass dish to keep for baking. Why does she ask you to do that?

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Everyday Chemistry - Collodion: the stuff of horror and healing

We may rarely watch a horror movie, but we often wonder how those grotesque effects were created. Or perhaps how film artists make fake scars and bruises. Let's explore the chemistry of special effects make-up!

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Aqua Regia and dissolving gold

Gold has always been considered the metal of kings. Yet even this precious metal cannot withstand the chemistry of Aqua Regia - dissolver of gold.

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Everyday Chemistry - How do we clean up an oil spill?

We've been seeing news of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, but now there's one much closer home. After two ships collided on Monday in the Arabian Sea, lots of petroleum has leaked, and is reaching the coast of Mumbai. How bad is it going to get?

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Everyday Chemistry - The story of gums: the plot gets thicker

What makes chewing gum gummy? What makes jam jammy? What makes sauce saucy? It's gum! So let's read a story about gums.

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Everyday Chemistry - Indoor Pollution: The Dangers at Home

It is so refreshing to get back inside the house after a tiring day, leaving behind the noise, air and light pollution of the traffic. But did you know that pollution is as serious a problem indoors as it is outdoors?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Carvone (Spearmint)

Chewing gum is so much fun to have. Who can resist the fresh taste of spearmint? Did you know that the chemical Carvone is responsible for this fantastic flavor?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Fiery phosphorus

You know a match helps to light a fire but did you know phosphorus is the key element used in making match sticks? This video explains the chemical characteristics of phosphorus and why it is such a hot element.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why are Noble Gases noble?

In many cultures, those who do not get angry when provoked, do not get influenced by anything and keep their dignity when in the presence of 'base' people are called 'noble'. Now what if a gas showed these traits? Would you call it a Noble Gas?

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Everyday Chemistry - What gives gems their colour?

If you've seen 'Pirates of the Caribbean', you'll have seen people fighting over rubies, pearls, diamonds and other coloured stones. What makes them so colourful and shiny, and why are they so precious?

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Everyday Chemistry - Mirror Compounds - A Tale of Twins

You'd have seen few twins as unlike each other as the boys in the Suite Life of Zack and Cody. In chemistry too, there are twins, like the chemicals that give oranges and lemons their flavours. They're called mirror compounds.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why is Copper added to Gold Jewellery?

Let's tell you a jeweller's secret - the gold jewellery your mom wears, isn't pure gold at all! It's actually an alloy of copper or silver with varying amounts of gold! So why do jewellers and goldsmiths do this?

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Everyday Chemistry - What makes perfumes smell nice?

When your mom is going to a party, you'll have seen her spray on some expensive perfume. Why does she do this? What's the secret in the bottle?

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Everyday Chemistry - How does milk of magnesia work?

If you don't eat on time, you get a feeling of uneasiness and stomach pain, right? Adults call it acidity. Let's see what it means, and how milk of magnesia can cure it.

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Everyday Chemistry - Chemistry of fibreglass

If we told you that you could make a crash-proof car entirely out of glass, you'ld never believe us. But not just cars, even motor-boats and aeroplanes are made of glass today. The secret is in how the glass is made - as fibres!

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Everyday Chemistry - How is artificial rain made?

What's common to boiling water, artificial rain and the Mentos-Diet Coke reaction? It's nucleation! Let's see what that means.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Guncotton

Today, we know nitrocellulose as the material with which film rolls are made. But did you know there's a raw form of it called guncotton?

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Everyday Chemistry - How are synthetic fibres made?

Imagine you're getting late for school, and you discover that your shirt hasn't been ironed. It makes you so angry, doesn't it? Well, do you know there are fabrics that don't need ironing? They're called synthetics.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Hydrochloric Acid

It's a very dangerous acid, and yet it's found in our stomachs and helps us digest food! Let's know more about hydrochloric acid.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: More About Hydrochloric Acid

In an earlier video, we learned a bit about hydrochloric acid. Let's understand more about this famous acid.

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Everyday Chemistry - The Artificial Ripening of Fruits

If you've ever had a fruit before it ripens, you'll never forget the sour, unpleasant taste. So why are fruits unripe in the first place, and why does it ripen later on? Let's look beneath the skin.

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Everyday Chemistry - How do lithium ion rechargeable batteries work?

Once you've used a battery, you've got to throw it away. But batteries contain many poisonous chemicals, which damage the environment. That's why the world is shifting to rechargeable batteries. Shall we see how these work?

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Everyday Chemistry - The Chemistry of Cheese-making

Who does not love cheese - whether as the sticky covering on hot pizza or as the hard cubes that are delicious to nibble at? Let's have a look at how it is made, and try and make some ourselves.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Penicillin

Sometimes, a molecule comes along that changes the whole world. One such is penicillin - the antibiotic that has saved countless lives since it was discovered accidentally. Let's know more.

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Everyday Chemistry - What is neutral soap?

Some people nowadays use special liquid soaps and beauty bars to wash their hands, instead of regular soap. Think they're being snobby? Not really. Let's have a peep into what's in those special soaps.

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Everyday Chemistry - What are antioxidants?

All of us love drinking fruit juice. Did you know they provide us with a nutrient we really need - antioxidants. Let's see how.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Exploding Cake

When you think of a chemist, do you think of a serious person in a white coat? But chemists love to have fun too, in their own special way. Here's a video of a special chemistry party!

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Everyday Chemistry - What makes Teflon non-sticky?

Ever tried to make an omelette in an ordinary frying pan? Did it stick to the pan and give you a hard time getting it off, right? That's why we use Teflon-coated non-stick pans. Let's see what is non-stick about it.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why is boric powder used in carrom boards?

Say 'acid' and what's the image that comes to mind? A fuming liquid inside a glass jar, too dangerous to handle. We don't think of boric acid, do we? But it's among the most useful chemicals to have around the house!

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Everyday Chemistry - Why do confection products use invert sugar?

Who doesn't like boiled sweets? The translucent colours and shapes, and the sweet seeping into the tongue as you suck on the sweet. So why not have a look into how they are made?

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Silver Mirror

Do you know that the reflecting side of a mirror is made of silver? Here's a video that shows you how to make one!

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Everyday Chemistry - Why is salt used to thaw ice?

Have you seen people sprinkling salt over snow in the winter? (You might have seen it on TV) It's used to keep the roads free of snow. It's also the way to make ice-cream!

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Chocolates and Roses

We like it so much when we are given chocolates and roses as gifts. Here's a video that tells you about the chemistry that makes them so pleasant.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Heavy Water

Heavy water is made of a heavier isotope of hydrogen called deuterium. But is it really heavier than water? Here's a video that finds out.

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Everyday Chemistry - How is a mirror silvered?

Ever been to a mirror maze in an amusement park? Did the reflections get you completely lost, and made you wonder how these things are made? If yes, you'll find the answers here!

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: a bigger periodic table?

We created an interactive periodic table for you that explains all about elements in a fun way. Now news comes that the table might just get bigger!

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Everyday Chemistry - How do light sticks work?

If you go on a camping vacation, do pack some light sticks in your kit. They are useful for getting some light without electricity or matches. And they come in lots of colours.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Chemistry in India

Let's join Prof. Poliakoff on a journey through India, as he experiences both achievement and tragedy in chemistry.

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Everyday Chemistry - What causes 'hospital smell'?

Ever stepped into a hospital, and immediately noticed the curious smell? It's not the smell of disease, but of a particular disinfectant that hospitals prefer to use. This disinfectant is iodoform.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why do pumice stones float in water?

Imagine having a bath with volcanic foam. Weird? Not really, because lots of people use it everyday - as pumice stones.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why is sulfuric acid called the king of chemicals?

What's common to petrol, fertilizers, cars and soaps? They, like a lot of other things, require sulfuric acid to be made. That's why sulfuric acid is called the king of chemicals.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Graphene

Imagine a great sheet of material just one atom thick, but which is very useful. Here's a video about it.

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Everyday Chemistry - Cream of tartar: your friend in the kitchen

Why are tarts and pastries made in bakeries so much smoother than when we make them at home? That's because they use a secret ingredient - cream of tartar.

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Everyday Chemistry - Video: Mountaintop Chemistry

Did you think chemistry meant there had to be a big lab with lots of gadgets? Here's a video, where scientists make an anti-cancer drug - in a tent on top of a mountain!

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Everyday Chemistry - What is dry ice?

Tried making ice-cream at home? All that ice and salt makes such a mess, doesn't it? What if there was a dry kind of ice, that didn't melt into a mess? Well, there is - it's called dry ice.

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Everyday Chemistry - How does Mayonnaise remain creamy all the time?

Mayonnaise is such a fun thing to eat - it goes with bread, chapattis, burgers, pizzas, everything. How does it stay creamy all the time - even though it keeps going in and out of the fridge?

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Everyday Chemistry - What is Ozonised Water?

In your school water cooler, you might have seen a huge, inverted plastic jar saying 'Ozonised water'. Ever wondered why anyone wants to put ozone in drinking water?

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Everyday Chemistry - Are tins really made of tin?

Ever waited impatiently, for mum or dad to open a tin of pineapples or rosogollas, floating in sugar syrup? Did you know the tin can isn't actually made of tin?

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Everyday Chemistry - What causes aluminium to stain?

If you've seen mom or dad cooking rice in an aluminium pressure cooker, you might notice they put a slice of lemon in the cooker. Wonder why they do that? What would happen if the lemon wasn't there?

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Everyday Chemistry - How does thermal ink work?

Can you write without ink on a piece of paper? If you had some special fax paper, and an old refill, there's a special trick you can use to write. That's called thermal printing!

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Everyday Chemistry - Why does stainless steel remain stainless?

Actually, stainless steel does get stains that may be hard to remove. But 'stain' here refers to rust, which is something stainless steel rarely catches. Ever wondered why?

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Everyday Chemistry - Why do old books become yellow?

Walk into a big library, and you'll see many old books that have become yellow and brittle. Why did that happen? How can we make them stay fresh forever?

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Everyday Chemistry - Why are Octane Ratings important?

Have you ever wondered about how petrol actually powers your car's engine? Or how safe it is? Here is a closer look at the chemistry behind octane and how its rating works.

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Everyday Chemistry - How is milk powder made?

Who doesn't love the taste of milk powder, whether dry or dissolved in milk. Do you know that as powder, milk can be preserved for years together? Let's have a look into how it is made.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why are people's fingers marked during elections?

Whenever an election comes round, you'll see that people who voted have an ink mark on their fingers. Why do they get it, and why does it not rub off?

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Everyday Chemistry - How do you froth milk?

When you go to a coffee shop, do you wonder how they make those pretty patterns on the coffee froth? And did you ever wonder why you get a thick froth in the shop coffee, but just a thin one at home?

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Everyday Chemistry - How are essences made?

When you open a bottle of rose or lavender scent, do you wonder how it came to be there? Let's have a look at how the fragrance of a rose is trapped and bottled!

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Everyday Chemistry - How do plaster casts help healing?

If any of your friends has had an accident, you'll see the hurt arm covered in plaster. Why do doctors do this? Chemistry tells us why.

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Everyday Chemistry - How does aqua regia clean gold ornaments?

Sometimes you may have seen an old gold ornament at home that has got spots or other signs of age. Your parents may take it to a 'polisher' to get it cleaned and polished. But did you know that the polisher actually removes a layer of gold?

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Everyday Chemistry - How is float glass made?

Nowadays, we see buildings that seem to be made entirely of glass. Huge sheets of glass that rise to several storeys. Let's have a peek at how these glass sheets are made.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why do some dyes 'run' when washed?

You may be familiar with this. You bought a very attractive looking dress, but it lost some of its colour when you washed it. Ever wondered what caused it to lose colour? Let's have a look.

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Everyday Chemistry - What are watermarks?

Have you held a currency note to the light and seen all the secret pictures on it? Those are called watermarks. Let's have a peek into how they are made.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why do cut apples turn brown?

You start eating an apple, and just then you friend calls you up about homework, and you're speaking for hours together. When you come back to your apple, it's gone brown all over. What happened?

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Everyday Chemistry - Why do jet planes leave a trail behind them?

Ever looked at a blue, cloudless sky, and seen a jet plane fly across it, leaving a long, thin trail of white clouds? Have you noticed that passenger planes don't seem to leave any trail like that? Let's find out why.

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Everyday Chemistry - Why is blood collected in 'heparinised' vials?

When you have to take a blood test, do you notice that the lab person collects your blood into a special tube marked 'heparinised'? Let's find out why a special vial is needed.

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Best Chemistry Teacher - Best chemistry teacher awards 2012 sponsored by Godrej

500 million Indians choose Godrej everyday. We believe that the best is yet to come.

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